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Technical Committee Reports

Lost Interpretations Found

Effective Date: 
April 11, 2011

Daniel Hansen from Denmark called to our attention that some of the past Interpretations of the Specifications had been omitted from the current class documents.

Jim McDonagh, Class Secretary, has reviewed his files and has discovered that for the last few years additional past interpretations were omitted in the printing of the yearbooks beginning in 2006 and including the present yearbook. Each year as we proof read the yearbook, we referred to the prior year and did not realize pages had been omitted for several years. I have now reviewed older yearbooks and agree with Jim on the wording of the omitted interpretations.

My thanks to Daniel Hansen for calling this to our attention and to Jim McDonagh for taking the time to research his files to find omitted text. Fortunately, I am not aware there have been any incorrect rulings made by race officials as the result of this error.

Missing since 2006, were the 9/1/99 interpretation for G. Sail, the complete section H. Rigging, and I. Fittings up to and including the 4/15/90 interpretation.

It is encouraged for members to review the sections below of the Interpretations of the Official Specifications of the DN IceYacht.

G. Sail Interpretations
H. Rigging Interpretations
I. Fittings Interpretations

regards
Jane Pegel
chairperson
Technical Committee

DN Sail Batten Interpretations Issued by the Technical Committee

Effective Date: 
November 29, 2010

G. Sail

11/29/2010
In specification G.9. the batten width is measured at 90 degrees to the length. Batten thickness is the smallest of the three dimensions, i.e. length, width, thickness. There are no restrictions on batten thickness.
11/29/2010
Specification G.12. excludes batten adjustment from the factors that alter sail characteristics. Battens may be fitted only in the pockets allowed in G.7. and may protrude from the pocket at the leach end for the purpose of providing a means to secure the batten in the sail and adjusting the tension. There is no restriction on the tensioning of battens in the pockets and at any time battens may be interchanged in the allowed pockets.

IDNIYRA Change of Runner Specifications

Effective Date: 
October 01, 2010

Prepared for Runner Tracks by Jane Pegel,
Chairman IDNIYRA Technical Committee

Sailors have been confused by the wording in the runner specifications regarding the, edges of the steel, particularly the edge radii and the fairing and tapering of the edges of the steel.

Most recently there were differences of opinion in the interpretations of the runner specifications during the 2010 World’s Championship.

Since the close of the 2010 Championship, the Technical Committee has been working diligently to find a way to make the specifications more understandable by the average sailor.

Interpretations have been written and in some instances the wording of the specifications has been modified without making changes in the intent of the specifications.

These interpretations and changes in the wording of the specifications become effective October 1, 2010

E. Runners

9. The leading edge of the runner steel is that portion of the edge forward of the sharpened
ice contact edge and higher than ¾” (19 mm) above the ice, measured with the runner in
normal sailing position. The sharpened ice contact edge of the runner steel is along the entire bottom edge and extends forward and upward along the edge of the steel to a point
not exceeding ¾” (19 mm) above the ice, measured with the runner in normal sailing position. The leading edge must be rounded with no sharp angle point and shall be faired to the sides of the steel as allowed in E.12. The sharpened ice contact edge may be rounded or sharpened to an included angle of not less than 75 degrees. The camber (crown) and shape of the sharpened ice contact edge is optional. Along the sharpened ice contact edge, the rounded edge or the sharpened angle is allowed to be faired to the sides of the steel providing the thickness of the steel of plate, insert style or T runners is not reduced below the allowed minimum. (ref. E.1.a., E.2.f., E.2.h).

12. Along the leading edge of the steel (ref. E.9.), the minimum allowed steel thickness of
plate, insert style, and T runners must be reached within .394”' (10 mm) measured from
the normal tangents of the leading edge (does not apply to 'angle' type runners.)

DN Runner Interpretations Issued by the Technical Committee

Effective Date: 
October 01, 2010

Prepared for Runner Tracks by Jane Pegel,
Chairman IDNIYRA Technical Committee

Sailors have been confused by the wording in the runner specifications regarding the, edges of the steel, particularly the edge radii and the fairing and tapering of the edges of the steel.

Most recently there were differences of opinion in the interpretations of the runner specifications during the 2010 World’s Championship.

Since the close of the 2010 Championship, the Technical Committee has been working diligently to find a way to make the specifications more understandable by the average sailor.

Interpretations have been written and in some instances the wording of the specifications has been modified without making changes in the intent of the specifications.

These interpretations and changes in the wording of the specifications become effective October 1, 2010

E. Runners

3/18/89, amended 10-1-2010
The thickness of the steel plate in insert runners may not be reduced below the minimum thickness of .1875” except as permitted in specification E.12.
10/1/2010
The interpretation dated 4/14/2010 has been clarified in the rewording of specification E9, effective 10/1/2010. DELETE 4/14/2010 which read: In specification E.9. the last sentence states that it is not allowed to taper or thin the ¼” (6.35mm) thick steel plate runner below the minimum allowed thickness toward the sharpened ice contact edge. Therefore the interpretation dated 1974 that repeats the language of E.9. is removed the interpretations.
10/1/2010
Diagram 19 mm Dimension (attached to be published in Runner Tracks and in the yeabook).[img_assist|nid=133|title=|desc=|link=node|align=left|width=640|height=376]

DN Runner Interpretations Issued by the Technical Committee

Effective Date: 
April 14, 2010

E. Runners

4/14/2010
In Specification E.9. the last sentence states that it is not allowed to taper or thin the ¼” (6.35mm) thick steel plate runner below the minimum allowed thickness toward the sharpened ice contact edge. Therefore the interpretation dated 1974 that repeats the language of E.9. is removed from the interpretations.
4/14/2010
In a previous 1974 interpretation the second sentence referring to hard weld on the ice contact edge of allowed “T” sections is deleted. This interpretation now reads: A slot may be machined on the top of allowed “T” sections to facilitate mounting to wood body.
4/14/2010
Hard weld may be applied to the ice contact edge of all runners.
4/14/2010
A previous 1974 interpretation that disallowed the welding of a bead in the corner of “T” runners is deleted and replaced with a new interpretation: Runner “T’ sections may not be formed by welding and may not be altered by welding a bead in the corners.
4/14/2010
The steel angle section allowed in E.2.f need not be mounted symmetrically on the wood body but must be mounted to the wood body in a manner that the ice contact edge corresponds to the apex of the included angle of the steel section.

“Kent” style Chock Interpretations

Effective Date: 
January 15, 2010

B. Runner Plank

1/15/2010
When the use of the reinforcement bar or stiffening element
that is associated with the “Kent” style chock does not comply with
interpretations I. Fittings dated 1/15/2010, and E. Runners dated 1/15/2010,
the bar will be considered part of the chock and must comply with the
materials as specified in I. 13. and will be included as hardware in determining
the overall length of the runner plank as specified in B.1.

I. Fittings

1/15/2010
The reinforcement bar or stiffening element that is associated
with the “Kent” style chock is allowed to be attached only to the runner and
must meet all requirements of a runner stiffener. Reference Specifications
E. 1.e; E. 1.f.; E. 4; and Interpretations E. Runners, 11/14/89; E. Runners
7/1/92; E. Runners 1/15/2010.

E. Runners

1/1/5/2010
The reinforcement bar or stiffening element that is associated
with the “Kent” style chock is part of the runner and must meet all
requirements of a runner stiffener, Reference Specifications E.1.e; E.1.f; E.4;
Interpretations B. Runner Plank, 1/15/2010; E. Runners, 11/14/89, 7/1/92,1/15/2010, and I. Fittings, 1/15/2010.
1/15/2010
All runner stiffening elements are considered part of the runner
and are included in the runner weight. Reference specification E.6
1/15/2010
The specification making optional the method of attachment of
stiffening elements to plate runners, Specification, E.1.f. also applies to the
method of attachment of stiffening elements in wood body runners.
Attachment is defined as a physical connection that firmly adheres the
stiffening element to the runner such that when the chock pivot bolt is
removed the stiffening element remains physically connected to the runner.
Reference Interpretation 7/1/92.
1/15/2010
At all times while in use the bar or stiffening element that is
associated with the “Kent” style chock must be attached to the runner. Any
movement of the bar or stiffening element shall be independent of and not
controlled by the movement of the chock pivot bolt.

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